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President Volodymyr Zelensky in his office on March 28, 2024. (Volodymyr Zelensky / Telegram)
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President Volodymyr Zelensky and U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Mike Johnson held a phone call on March 28, Zelensky announced on social media.

U.S. aid to Ukraine has been delayed since fall 2023 amid infighting in Congress. In February, a $95 billion aid package to Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan passed in the Senate with bipartisan support, but Johnson has so far stalled bringing it to a vote in the Republican-led House of Representatives.

Johnson is expected to introduce a Ukraine aid bill to the House after Congress returns from Easter recess.

"I thanked him personally, both parties, the American people and President (Joe) Biden for the vital support of Ukraine since the beginning of the Russian invasion," Zelensky said.

Zelensky said he spoke with Johnson about the situation on the battlefield and the "rapid increase" in Russian strikes on civilians.

"In the past week alone, Ukrainian cities and communities were hit by 190 rockets, 140 shaheds (attack drones), and 700 aerial bombs," Zelensky reported.

"In this situation, quick approval by Congress of aid to Ukraine is critically important," Zelensky said.

With aid stuck in Congress, Ukraine faces an ongoing ammunition shortage, with the country being in dire need of shells and missiles.

Munitions for some of Ukraine's air defense systems may be nearly used up by the end of March, the Washington Post reported on March 15, citing unnamed Western officials.

"We also discussed the need to close the sources from which Russia finances its war as soon as possible, and the use of frozen Russian assets for the benefit of Ukraine," Zelensky said.

Republicans are reportedly warming to the idea of using frozen Russian assets to provide funding for Ukraine, as lawmakers look into alternative ways of funding and delivering critically needed aid.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned, however, that any plan to seize or monetize frozen Russian assets to help Ukraine can not be considered a substitute for the aid that is stuck in Congress.

Missiles hit Kyiv seconds after air raid alert, leaving people no time to shelter
“Masha is safe. And we now have a terrace,” Andrii Petrus, a barista, said while pouring coffee into a paper cup. The coffee shop he was working in had its window frames blown out by the explosion following yet another Russian missile attack on Kyiv — a third over the

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