Skip to content
Edit post

Russian student jailed for renaming Wi-Fi network to pro-Ukraine salute

by Dmytro Basmat March 10, 2024 6:08 AM 2 min read
Barbed wire is seen on top of the wall of Moscow's Lefortovo prison on Apr. 4, 2023. The prison is known for being the place where political prisoners await their trial. Serhii Karmazin, a Ukrainian civilian arrested on sabotage charges, and Evan Gershkovich, a Wall Street Journal reporter arrested on espionage charges, are among the detainees of Lefortovo. (Vlad Karkov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
This audio is created with AI assistance

Support independent journalism in Ukraine. Join us in this fight.

Become a member Support us just once

A Russian student at Moscow State University received a 10-day jail sentence for renaming a Wi-Fi network name to "Slava Ukraini" - a Ukrainian national salute that means “Glory to Ukraine," Moscow court documents revealed on March 9.

On Thursday, a Moscow court found the student guilty of displaying "symbols of extremist organisations" under Russia's criminal code.

The student was arrested just one day earlier, on Wednesday, when a police officer discovered the network name in the university's student accommodation quarters. The student's room was subsequently searched and Wi-Fi router seized.

The Moscow court alleged that the Wi-Fi name was being used to promote the pro-Ukrainian salute. As a result, the student was found guilty of "public demonstration of Nazi symbolism."

Russian President Vladimir Putin has repeatedly made false claims about a "neo-Nazi regime" to justify Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

Tens of thousands of Russian have been arrested and sentenced to prisoner terms for showing dissent against Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

In 2023, at least 21,000 people were targeted by Russia's "repressive laws" used to "crack down on anti-war activists," according to Amnesty International.

The term "Slava Ukraini" is used as a patriotic rallying cry among Ukrainians, akin to "God save the King" in the U.K. or "Vive la France." The phrase can be traced back over a century and is tied to Ukrainians’ efforts to build an independent state, most notably in the face of enduring Russian aggression.

Russian man sentenced to 7.5 years for criticizing Ukraine invasion, Stalin
Igor Orlovsky, a resident of Russia’s Krasnoyarsk Krai, was sentenced to seven and half years in prison for critical comments about the invasion of Ukraine and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, the Russian independent outlet OVD-Info reported on Nov. 13.
Support independent journalism in Ukraine. Join us in this fight.
Freedom can be costly. Both Ukraine and its journalists are paying a high price for their independence. Support independent journalism in its darkest hour. Support us for as little as $1, and it only takes a minute.
visa masterCard americanExpress

News Feed

Ukraine Daily
News from Ukraine in your inbox
Ukraine news
Please, enter correct email address
3:45 PM

Moldova, EU sign pact on security, defense.

"It (partnership) will allow to jointly address common security challenges, make our engagement more effective and explore new areas of cooperation," European Union's top diplomat Josep Borrell said.
9:24 AM

Russian delegation arrives in North Korea.

According to U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, these military ties are increasingly a "two-way street," in which North Korea provides Russia with military equipment to use in Ukraine.
MORE NEWS

Editors' Picks

Enter your email to subscribe
Please, enter correct email address
Subscribe
* indicates required
* indicates required
Subscribe
* indicates required
* indicates required
Subscribe
* indicates required

Subscribe

* indicates required
Subscribe
* indicates required

Subscribe

* indicates required
Subscribe
* indicates required

Subscribe

* indicates required
Successfuly subscribed
Thank you for signing up for this newsletter. We’ve sent you a confirmation email.