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ISW: Kremlin tries to fix mobilization 'mistakes,' but it can't calm Russians anymore

by The Kyiv Independent news desk September 27, 2022 1:53 PM 1 min read
Police officers detain a man in Moscow on Sept. 24, following calls to protest against the mobilization announced by Russian President Vladimir Putin on Sept. 21.
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The Kremlin calls the widespread violations of mobilization law "individual errors" and promises to punish "unmotivated and careless employees of the military-recruitment centers," but such messages will unlikely solve Russia's problems, according to the Institute for the Study of War.

"Unlike Russian failures in Ukraine, which the Kremlin has been able to minimize or deflect because its citizens cannot see them directly, violations of the mobilization decree are evident to many Russians," the ISW reported on Sept. 27.

Since the announcement of mobilization on Sept. 21, Russia has been conscripting men older than the eligible age, those without military experience, and those with medical conditions. Now the Kremlin "faces a daunting task in trying to calm the Russian people while still mobilizing enough men to keep fighting," the ISW wrote.

Russian news outlet Meduza reported on Sept. 25 that at least 11 military-recruitment centers had been set on fire in Russia since Russian President Vladimir Putin announced mobilization.

In a separate case, on Sept. 26, a 25-year-old Russian man opened fire at a military-recruiting station in Irkutsk Oblast, critically wounding its commander.

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